Post Tension of Reinforced Concrete – Detailed Process

Post tension is a technique for reinforcing concrete. Post-tensioning tendons, which are prestressing steel cables inside plastic ducts or sleeves, are positioned in the forms before the concrete is placed. Afterwards, once the concrete has gained strength but before the service loads are applied, the cables are pulled tight, or tensioned, and anchored against the outer edges of the concrete.

Post-tensioning is a form of prestressing. Prestressing simply means that the steel is stressed before the concrete has to support the service loads. Most precast, prestressed concrete is actually pre-tensioned-the steel is pulled before the concrete is poured. Post-tensioned concrete means that the concrete is poured and then the tension is applied-but it is still stressed before the loads are applied so it is still prestressed.

This video posted by FirthIndustriesNZ’s channel on YouTube captures beautifully the 10 hour process of post-tensioning the airport hangar floor in just 5 minutes. This amazing work was done by Firth for Fletcher Construction.

Construction of post-tensioned slabs on grade is very similar to using reinforcing steel, except for the tensioning step. Cables are arranged as indicated by the engineer and chaired to run through the center of the slab.

Post-tensioning has several benefits like as it reduces or eliminates shrinkage cracking-therefore no joints, or fewer joints, are needed. Cracks that do form are held tightly together. It allows slabs and other structural members to be thinner. It allows us to build slabs on expansive or soft soils. It lets us design longer spans in elevated members, like floors or beams.

Post Tension Concrete